And No Religion, Too...


Spring has sprung, and with it comes Easter, the day that Christians all around the world celebrate the resurrection of Christ. This has always been an interesting holiday for my family, a fraction being very religious, and the other fraction (my immediate family) being very non-religious. We originally celebrated it at my Grandmother’s house with an Easter egg hunt and brunch before she passed over 20 years ago.

My Grandmother was most definitely Christian, but she completely loved and accepted me, no matter my heathen ways. I could literally talk to her about anything, and would even attend church with her from time to time just because I knew it made her happy. Plus, there was something about the way she would sing from the hymnal that I loved – totally off key, but with such beautiful reverence.

In the years since she passed, my mother has taken on the Easter festivities. The dynamic has changed as my more religious relatives have branched off into their own brand of celebration, and now for us it really is just about the Bunny and a good excuse to get together and stuff our faces. This being said, I honor whatever celebratory practice anyone chooses (or doesn’t choose) during this time, as long as it’s done in the name of love – which is what was Jesus was all about anyway.

I hope that those with strong religious affiliation don’t take offense from this week’s message, but instead understand that it actually supports the idea of religion as a means to an end in regard to uplifting our society. It refers to the mindset and values that one brings to their chosen religious practice. Simply put, are you doing it to increase and spread love, or to enact an air of superiority? You can’t have one in the face of the other. I’ve seen such disparity in how people use their religion, my hope is at the end of the day everyone understands the power it has to either bring people together or tear them apart. Please practice responsibly.

With Love.

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From Over There:
“Religion as a practice is only as pure as the practitian.  When religious dogma turns to hate and violence it has lost its usefulness and creates a forum for those who wish to control and dominate. When this occurs, the religious principles are no better than oppressive government systems. Acts of persecution in the name of religion will eventually fail as the evolutionary process toward enlightenment continues. This trend of enlightenment will generate a greater division of those moving toward evolved belief systems, and individuals attempting to hold onto archaic methods of expression.

If one is to value religious expression as a betterment to society, it is necessary to embrace religious practices that value the whole of society, not just those whose beliefs concur.  It is the religious principles that promote greater awareness and inclusion that support the advancement of enlightened consciousness.”

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Featured Guest: His Holiness, the 14th Dalai Lama
Because I believe that this man embraces compassion and love for all individuals – regardless of religious or non-religious persuasion – I have for you a slightly truncated version of his “Three Main Commitments”.

1.  His Holiness’ first commitment is the promotion of human values such as compassion, forgiveness, tolerance, contentment and self-discipline.  All human beings are the same.  We all want happiness and do not want suffering.  Even people who do not believe in religion recognize the importance of these human values in making their life happier.  His Holiness refers to these human values as secular ethics. 
 
2.  His Holiness’ second commitment is the promotion of religious harmony and understanding among the world’s major religious traditions.  Despite philosophical differences, all major world religions have the same potential to create good human beings.  It is therefore important for all religious traditions to respect one another and recognize the value of each other’s respective traditions.   3. His Holiness is a Tibetan and carries the name of the ‘Dalai Lama’.  Tibetans place their trust in him.  Therefore, his third commitment is to the Tibetan issue.  His Holiness’ has a responsibility to act as the free spokesperson of the Tibetans in their struggle for justice. 


To learn more, please visit www.dalailama.com.

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If you'd like more information, to book an appointment, or check out the current class schedule, please visit molliejensen.com.