An Honest Reaction

When pondering this week’s message I completely agree that to feel fully free to speak the truth you must first be (at least somewhat) unattached to the fallout of what you disclose. This can be difficult when telling someone something that you know may hurt them, but I’ve found that taking full responsibility for your words is vital to moving through and on to resolution. Accepting responsibility also lessens any potential defensiveness from the delivery and feels more authentic to the one on the receiving end.

On the other hand, I believe that parts of the message this week don’t necessarily apply to certain work related situations. Why yes, while I think it’s ALWAYS important to hold yourself accountable for what is being said, I’m not quite sure being in an unattached state of mind is as helpful. For instance, the practice of sales is solely based on focusing intention on a particular reaction from the recipient of the information. Sales wouldn’t be sales without it. And what about lawyers? This line of work is all about how well an argument is delivered. Definitely a form of manipulation and you couldn’t be a successful lawyer without it. 

My point in all of this is to know when to turn it on and turn it off in regard to personal vs. work-related communications. No one wants to feel as if they’re constantly being sold on an idea or situation. I know for me that when I’ve had people in my life that are constantly “on” (ie, in selling mode) it’s hard to decipher whether they’re being truthful or not. It feels as if there is a constant undercurrent of manipulation taking place. Though I’m certainly not condoning dishonesty in any form, I do know that sometimes it’s necessary to use a little sales tactics or present a good argument at work to move ahead and get things done – it just  isn’t the best form of communication in building strong, honest personal relationships.

With Love.

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From Over There:
“When speaking the truth it is important do so without expectation to reaction. When one speaks truthfully with an attachment to the desired outcome, one runs the risk of censorship of oneself, sabotaging the act of full disclosure. The consequences of disclosing the truth may be assuaged in the delivery of information. To deliver through the heart with sincerity and an acceptance of responsibility for the information opens the possibility of honest dialog between parties. To deliver with an agenda creates the possibility of attempted manipulation by the bearer of information. In the presence of manipulation there can be no real truth.”

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Featured Guest: Seth Godin
Seth Godin has written fourteen books that have been translated into more than thirty languages. He writes about the post-industrial revolution, the way ideas spread, marketing, quitting, leadership and most of all, changing everything.

American Way Magazine calls him, "America's Greatest Marketer," and his blog is perhaps the most popular in the world written by a single individual. His latest book, We Are All Weird, calls for end of mass and for the beginning of offering people more choices, more interests and giving them more authority to operate in ways that reflect their own unique values. To learn more, please visit sethgodin.com.

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