For Trayvon

I had already written and posted this week’s message prior to the verdict being announced regarding George Zimmerman and his role in the death of Trayvon Martin, and since I felt compelled to speak on the subject there will be two posts. As a white woman with light hair, light eyes and a slim build I know I don’t pose a very threatening figure. I know that this has afforded me to, at times, move easily through the world without drawing much attention to myself. I also, try as I might, can’t imagine what it’s like to be black, especially a young black male in our society. And, I know that as much as some of us want to believe that we don’t judge one another by appearance, that’s simply not true. We do judge each other, though hopefully some of us do so with a little conscious awareness.

All of this has reminded me of a few times where I happened to be by myself while encountering another lone individual – a black male. I remember several occasions while in an elevator, climbing stairs, or simply walking down the street, that in virtually every instance was greeted with a very polite response, almost as if they were trying to make sure I felt comfortable in their presence. The more I observed this, the more I started to take notice of the differences between my encounters with white men vs. black men. By and large the men of color were much more polite. Oftentimes, in my encounters with white males I found that they didn’t even acknowledge me. I’m not saying in all instances, but definitely enough to take notice. What this has shown me is that white men, like me, can easily move throughout the world, and don’t really care if they’re noticed, because they don’t have to deal with the same instant reaction to their presence that black men do.

I find it horribly sad that today in our modern world a sector of society can never fully relax. I know as a woman I’ve had this experience, needing to be hyper-vigilant in paying attention to my surroundings to keep myself safe, but the issue of skin color goes much deeper than this. Derogatory assumptions are made solely based on the level of pigment one naturally displays, as if this were a marker of character. I wish so badly that we could evolve and learn to judge each other only on the merits of character alone, and not appearance, though it doesn’t look like that’s happening anytime too soon. It’s simply tragic that a young man is dead because of this.

What can we do until then? Maybe stop, check ourselves and our reactions, and don’t instantly assume? Not always easy in the moment, but staying conscious is a habit and necessary in choosing a more evolved way of thinking. We CAN get better at this. I’ve seen quite a few people who may have been raised to be intolerant of a certain segment of society change their views though experience and open-mindedness.  All it takes is a commitment to move past the fear and limiting beliefs.

Here’s to each of you, all beautiful members of the human race.

With Love.

P.S. Please see the other new post, Sister, Sister, below.

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From Over There:
“Brothers and sisters under the skin, you are all part of the human race. Genetics are part of the physical, not of the soul. The soul has no such boundaries. The genetic blueprint in which one carries into this world concerns the life and lessons while embodied – not before physical birth or after physical death occurs. To understand one’s self on a soul level opens for understanding of other’s beyond their physical presence. It opens to an expanded view of the human race as a whole being, not as racially divided entities.”

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Featured Guest: The National Resource Center for Racial Healing
The National Resource Center for Racial Healing (NRCHR) was created in 1999 as a 501(c) 3 not-for-profit organization. We begin where diversity training and judicial laws end. All the laws that can be written to eradicate racism have been passed or discussed with much debate. Our focus is creating a society that embraces the reality of the oneness of humankind, and the eradication of racism and its many forms that dehumanize or cause strife. Our methods and process help change the hearts of people by creating a safe environment to explore the disease of racial conditioning. Over fifteen hundred (1,500) have been trained by the NRCHR and the results are exceptional. Our processes not only work, but they are applicable to the masses, companies, and communities. To learn more, please visit nrchr.org.

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If you'd like more information, to book an appointment, or check out the current class schedule, please visit molliejensen.com.