Designer Labels

In my family I was known as “the baby” (aka youngest) growing up. At the time I wasn’t a big fan of the title, as to me it conveyed that my age somehow implied that I was inferior due to my lack of the experience or knowledge. Now that I have plenty of years behind me, I have absolutely no issue with this label and have to admit sometimes taking pleasure in reminding my older siblings of it. I think this is a good example of how we can interpret the meaning of a label we’re given and how we associate with that interpretation. It shows that it’s not so much the label itself, but the power that we allow it to have over us that affects us. I realize that the label “baby” may not be the most inflammatory, and that there are much harsher things that we as a human race label each other with. I won’t go into it too much as I’m sure you’re all very aware of the labels you’ve had to overcome in your own lives, though I know it took me a couple of decades to rid myself of the not-so-endearing names thrown at me in my youth.

The thing is, it seems every time we turn around there’s an opportunity for a label to be thrust upon us via the media, family, work relations, etc., etc., etc., and as a culture we have such a strong need to put a label on people and things so we can categorize them. How do we rise above it? As a culture we're most likely not going to stop labeling anytime soon so the best we can do is be conscious with how we use our labels – of ourselves and of others. Labeling can be used to uplift or degrade, or empower or imprison. It’s up to us as individuals first to decide the power we want to give to them, and what type of power that is. And if you have to label, why not give yourself and others a few to inspire and encourage?

My label for you all today is…”beautiful”…and it’s yours to do with however you’d like.

With Love.

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From Over There:
“The human need to label is unnecessary, though it is human nature to label and categorize in order to form identity. What one chooses to identify with creates a perspective and world view based on that identification. It is up to the individual how to use this perspective to interact with those around them.

When one releases the need to categorize oneself by identifying with a particular culture or label, one allows for perspective that is based on personal knowledge and spiritual wisdom, not on indoctrinated philosophy.  It is choice of the individual whether to adopt the cultural teachings around them, or to form their own independent perspective. It is those with the independent mind that are able to reside within a cultural group and retain the ability to dismiss the collective beliefs that feel misaligned with their spirit.

The self-identification with labels – whether self-made or created through cultural dynamic – may empower or disempower the individual. It is the evolved spirit that seeks cultural principles based on unifying humanity with kindness and personal responsibility.”

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Featured Guest: Guy P. Harrison
Guy P. Harrison is a writer dedicated to promoting science and reason. He is the author of five highly acclaimed books with critical thinking themes. This week I’m featuring an article he wrote, Four Simple Reasons Smart People Shouldn't Believe in Races, using anthropological references to describe how we really are just one race and that the concept that we are made up of different races is just a cultural creation. I found it very interesting and much food for thought. Could this just be a humongous form of labeling one another?